Interviews


Demi Moore


Occupation: Actress, Producer
Date of Birth: November 11, 1962
Place of Birth: Roswell, N.M., USA
Sign: Sun in Scorpio, Moon in Taurus
Relations: Husband (separated): Bruce Willis;ex-husband: Freddy Moore; kids: Rumer Glenn, Scout Larue, Tallulah Belle; companion: Oliver Whitcomb (martial arts instructor)
Education: High school dropout

 

FEW will contest Demi Moore's expertise in the titillation game. Perhaps she has become the queen of titillation because she throws her clothes off with great abandon; perhaps because she infuses nearly every interview she gives with her own special brand of in-your-face sass. But regardless of how she goes about it, Moore has managed to turn her sexual charisma into a job as one of the highest-paid actress in Hollywood.

Moore's childhood was anything but titillating. Born into the vagabond household of Danny and Virginia Guynes, a couple that married and divorced twice, Moore seemed destined for a white-trash existence. Her father was unemployably inept and gambled away what little money he made. As if that weren't enough, through part of her childhood, Demi was cross-eyed¨a condition that required two operations to correct. But by 16, Moore was out on her own, doing a little modeling, and putting her husky voice to use at a collection agency. At 18, she married Freddy Moore, a rock musician 12 years her senior. Though the marriage didn't last long, it held an unexpected key to her career: the Moores happened to live next door to an actress named Nastassja Kinski, who imposed upon Demi to help her rehearse scripts. Eventually, Moore decided to try acting herself. A year later, she beat out a thousand actresses for a continuing role on the daytime drama General Hospital. She made a couple of forgettable films during her Hospital days (Choices, Parasite), and left the soap when she landed the role of Michael Caine's daughter in Blame It on Rio (1984).

Moore's big breakthrough came in 1984, when she was cast as a cokehead in the seminal Brat Pack flick St. Elmo's Fire. Her role didn't require much preparation, since she had a drug problem herself, and one day, when she showed up snookered for wardrobe, director Joel Schumacher delivered an ultimatum: get sober or get fired. Moore used Schumacher's mandate to steel her resolve to kick her cocaine addiction and succeed as an actress. She met Emilio Estevez during filming, and the two began a three-year, on-again, off-again engagement, during which her career languished in duds like No Small Affair and Wisdom. Shortly after breaking up with Estevez for the last time, Moore crossed paths with Bruce Willis, the cheeky star of TV's Moonlighting. They married after a three-month courtship.

Just when it seemed Moore had suffered the curse of the Brat Pack, her mawkish film Ghost (1990) exploded at the box office. Moore was suddenly on the A-list; she survived a couple of duds, Mortal Thoughts and The Butcher's Wife, and, in 1992, found her way into A Few Good Men with Tom Cruise and Jack Nicholson. She then won the lead in Indecent Proposal, the first in a string of controversial roles she has since undertaken: in 1994's Disclosure, she played a ruthless sexual harasser; in The Scarlet Letter, she gave Nathaniel Hawthorne's classic tragic novel a happy ending (she later justified the wrongheaded decision by claiming that "not many people have read the book"); in the salacious Striptease, she proudly bared her considerable assets for an equally considerable $12.5-million salary.

Moore's personal life has been as much a saturnalian spectacle as any movie in which she has appeared. She and Willis became famous for their enormous entourage and for the extravagant bacchanals they hosted¨their wedding ceremony alone (performed by Little Richard) cost a reported $875,000. (On the other hand, they proved decidedly more mindful where the bottom line was concerned. They zealously helped along their Planet Hollywood investment by appearing at the frequent openings of the ever-mushrooming empire.) Moore and Willis even went a little nuts when it came time to name their three daughters: Rumer Glenn, Scout Larue, and Tallulah Belle. Scout made her national magazine debut in utero when Moore posed pregnant and nude on the cover of Vanity Fair.

Nudity, of course, has always been a favorite attention-grabbing tactic of Moore's¨she first posed nude in the early '80s for the skin magazine Oui, and her obviously enhanced breasts have continued to be a main attraction in such films as The Scarlet Letter and Striptease. In promotion of the latter film, Moore appeared on the Late Show With David Letterman sporting the top-ten list on cards all over her tiny-bikini-clad body. Sure, that was impressive, but not quite as impressive as her next Letterman appearance, during which she plugged her follow-on film, G.I. Jane, by displaying a shorn head and an eye-popping ability to do one-arm push-ups.

In June 1998, Moore and Willis went public with their intention to separate, but were not forthcoming about whether or not they intended to actually divorce, or about how they planned to deal with the custody of their children and the division of their considerable assets.

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